Here’s a list of Australia’s 50 biggest cities

Here’s a list of Australia’s 50 largest cities.

Of course Sydney remains Australia’s largest city — but maybe not for long.

There are now just 200,000 people separating Melbourne from Sydney — 4.9 million compared to 5.1 million — and if current trends continue the Victorian capital is poised to become the largest city in Australia in eight years, according to new Australian Bureau of Statistics data.

property marketMelbourne grew by 2.7 per cent in one year, 2016-17, adding more than 125,000 people.

It is one of the 10 fastest growing developed cities in the world and at that pace it’s population will grow by more than 10 per cent in the next 4 years.

Sydney’s growth is still strong (2 per cent), but not as spectacular, adding than 100,000 residents for the first time in its history,

Our two big super cities combined house about 40% of the nation’s population.

The demographers at id.com.au have compiled their annual list form the ABS data and come up with the following list.

If you’re wondering how they chose the boundaries for our big cities, check out the notes at the end of the list.

Rank
City (Significant Urban Area)
2017 Population
5-year growth
5 year growth %
 1 year growth
1 year growth %

1
Sydney
       4,741,874
               433,750
10.1%
             98,079
2.1%

2
Melbourne
       4,677,157
               557,346
13.5%
           119,975
2.6%

3
Brisbane
       2,326,656
               203,040
9.6%
             46,366
2.0%

4
Perth
       2,004,696
               141,620
7.6%
             19,789
1.0%

5
Adelaide
       1,315,346
                 55,749
4.4%
               9,535
0.7%

6
Gold Coast – Tweed Heads
          663,321
                 68,091
11.4%
             16,338
2.5%

7
Newcastle – Maitland
          481,183
                 23,063
5.0%
               4,529
1.0%

8
Canberra – Queanbeyan
          447,457
                 33,746
8.2%
               6,914
1.6%

9
Central Coast
          329,437
                 12,254
3.9%
               2,413
0.7%

10
Sunshine Coast
          325,399
                 36,616
12.7%
               7,995
2.5%

11
Wollongong
          299,203
                 15,531
5.5%
               3,534
1.2%

12
Geelong
          260,138
                 28,415
12.3%
               6,869
2.7%

13
Hobart
          208,324
                   8,743
4.4%
               2,227
1.1%

14
Townsville
          180,346
                   9,321
5.5%
               1,486
0.8%

15
Cairns
          151,925
                   9,701
6.8%
               1,884
1.3%

16
Toowoomba
          135,631
                   7,056
5.5%
               1,594
1.2%

17
Darwin
          132,708
                 12,281
10.2%
                  663
0.5%

18
Ballarat
          103,481
                   8,508
9.0%
               1,893
1.9%

19
Bendigo
            97,096
                   8,148
9.2%
               1,509
1.6%

20
Albury – Wodonga
            91,923
                   6,721
7.9%
               1,347
1.5%

21
Launceston
            86,788
                      863
1.0%
                  453
0.5%

22
Mackay
            80,427
–                     238
-0.3%
–                353
-0.4%

23
Rockhampton
            78,871
                   1,522
2.0%
                    76
0.1%

24
Bunbury
            74,478
                   4,480
6.4%
                  376
0.5%

25
Coffs Harbour
            70,857
                   3,599
5.4%
                  723
1.0%

26
Bundaberg
            70,578
                      727
1.0%
                  269
0.4%

27
Melton
            65,423
                 13,741
26.6%
               3,306
5.3%

28
Wagga Wagga
            56,181
                   1,767
3.2%
                  221
0.4%

29
Hervey Bay
            53,492
                   2,935
5.8%
                  686
1.3%

30
Mildura – Wentworth
            51,473
                   2,410
4.9%
                  475
0.9%

31
Shepparton – Mooroopna
            51,142
                   2,778
5.7%
                  449
0.9%

32
Port Macquarie
            46,948
                   3,005
6.8%
                  701
1.5%

33
Gladstone – Tannum Sands
            44,984
                   1,290
3.0%
– 102
-0.2%

34
Tamworth
            42,347
                   1,852
4.6%
                  369
0.9%

35
Traralgon – Morwell
            41,626
                      796
1.9%
                  293
0.7%

36
Orange
            40,079
                   1,864
4.9%
                  324
0.8%

37
Bowral – Mittagong
            39,300
                   2,714
7.4%
                  538
1.4%

38
Busselton
            38,289
                   5,156
15.6%
                  693
1.8%

39
Geraldton
            37,931
                      269
0.7%
– 358
-0.9%

40
Dubbo
            37,666
  2,111
5.9%
                  541
1.5%

41
Nowra – Bomaderry
            37,027
                   2,121
6.1%
                  318
0.9%

42
Warragul – Drouin
            36,538
                   5,235
16.7%
               1,185
3.4%

43
Bathurst
            36,448
                   2,343
6.9%
                  435
1.2%

44
Warrnambool
            34,912
                   1,504
4.5%
                  294
0.8%

45
Albany
            34,151
  1,628
5.0%
                  236
0.7%

46
Kalgoorlie – Boulder
            30,541
– 1,997
-6.1%
– 141
-0.5%

47
Devonport
            30,153
-73
-0.2%
                    87
0.3%

48
Mount Gambier
            29,472
 871
3.0%
                    15
0.1%

49
Lismore
            28,764
– 560
-1.9%
-215
-0.7%

50
Nelson Bay
            27,606
1,269
4.8%
                  246
0.9%

How did they chose the boundaries?

Where does Melbourne or Sydney stop and start?

Which boundaries did the demographers at id.com.au use? graphic-mel-new

They explain:

“…these figures are based on the “Significant Urban Area” geography. This is defined by the ABS as an aggregate of areas which roughly contain the continuous urban extent of a city without major gaps. It is different to the figures you might see elsewhere, which are based on “Greater Capital City Statistical Areas” (GCCSAs), and cover a wider labour market region where most people commute into the capitals to work.

For instance, the Sydney and Melbourne GCCSAs have 2017 populations of 5,131,326 and 4,850,740 respectively.

You can see the numbers below are a bit less than that, particularly for Sydney. That’s because non-contiguous urban areas are separated out in the Significant Urban Area classification. Australia_map

Sydney’s GCCSA population includes the Central Coast while the Significant Urban Area excludes it as it’s non-contiguous. The same goes for the centre of Melton on the outskirts of Melbourne. These are separate centres in this view of the world. This provides a better measure of true bounded urban areas, but neither version is “correct” or better than the other. It also enables capital city populations to be compared to regional centres in the list below, which don’t have a wider capital city area defined.”

Read more at id.com.au

You may also want to read:

HERE’S WHY MELBOURNE AND SYDNEY HAVE DECOUPLED FROM THE REST OF AUSTRALIA’S PROPERTY MARKETS

Read more: propertyupdate.com.au